Erlkönig's Daughter

Had lunch with a GamerGate supporter. (I didn’t know! An offhand comment brought it up inbetween football stuff he didn’t care about.) 

  • "They’re just outliers."
  • "It’s just online smack talk…"
  • "That doesn’t discount the entirely legitimate point…"
  • "The other side is threatening to rape and murder too…"
  • "The FBI hasn’t released a public statement so it can’t be real, legitimate threats…"
  • "So I should stop supporting something because…"
  • "They’re just trolls, it doesn’t count…"

I need someone to meet me for drinks after work today. PLEASE.

petermorwood:

armsandarmor:

ritasv:

IMG_5399 by Geckoo76 on Flickr.
Good grief…is that a claymore??  *blink*  Not being a weapon scholar, how do you carry a sword that is taller than you are?  Don’t you dare tell me ‘very carefully’, either.  *snort*
***Thank you to David for explaining that it is a replica of a German Zweihander!

For cutting into ranks of dudes holding pikes.

The average two-hander Highland claymore (there was a Lowland version too) was about a foot shorter than the average Zweihänder, and had a typical straight-armed crossguard sloping pointwards and ending in a quatrefoil…

I photographed this case of typical Zweihänders in Basel Historisches Museum a few years ago - typical very wide straight or curved guards, sometimes with side-rings, and those distinctive secondary guards (Parierhaken - “parrying hooks”) on the blade…

The men who used these were called Doppelsöldner (“double-pay men”), which they got supposedly for the dangerous duty of fighting in the front rank against opposing pikes, meaning something like this… 

The costumes and helmets suggest these are re-enactors of Thirty Years’ or English Civil War, meaning about 80-odd years after Zweihänders were common, but it gives an idea of why double pay was an incentive. I think they earned it!
However, they may also have got “special skills” double pay once they proved they could handle the big two-handers correctly and not cause blue-on-blue incidents like: “Oops, sorry Franz, were those your fingers/kidneys/entrails? Hey, this thing’s longer than it looks…”
Looking at Renaissance fight manuals (Marozzo, Meyer, di Grassi etc.,) the technique seems not just longsword, but also partly short polearm (something echoed in the way they were carried) which suggests using really big two-handers was a more complicated business than just “hold the safe end and hit the enemy with the sharp end.”

Neither they nor claymores were ever worn on a back-scabbard. I did a Google Image search for that obscure object of desire: modern and/or movie, every single one. No period back-scabbard is displayed in a museum, and nor does any period art show one in use, because the back-scabbard is a modern Renfair/Hollywood fantasy that didn’t exist before the late 20th century.
A commonly-seen interpretation of back-carried “claymore” is the Irish Gallowglass. Google-image that and you’ll find artwork, illustrations, figurines, war-gaming figures and even otherwise-careful re-enactors (guys, please!) with back-slung scabbards. The trouble is, they all seem based on nothing further back in history than this 1980s or 1990s painting by Angus McBride for one of the Osprey series…

…and since I don’t have the book, I don’t know where he or its author based their data for the scabbard. I’m pretty sure the rest came from this 1521 drawing by Albrecht Dürer of a real Gallowglass and his kern retainers. 

The great big sword is very much there, but any sort of back-scabbard is very much not. If anyone anywhere can find solid 500-year-old evidence that such a specialised item existed, I’ll be impressed, and more than a bit surprised. It hasn’t happened yet.
Period art…

..shows…

…Zweihänders…

…carried…

…like…

…this…

Some surprisingly long swords were carried slung from the waist (including Elizabethan rapiers so long that a law was passed to restrict their length) but to date, evidence for slinging any European sword across the wearer’s back stays in the file marked hic sunt dracones…

petermorwood:

armsandarmor:

ritasv:

IMG_5399 by Geckoo76 on Flickr.

Good grief…is that a claymore??  *blink*  Not being a weapon scholar, how do you carry a sword that is taller than you are?  Don’t you dare tell me ‘very carefully’, either.  *snort*

***Thank you to David for explaining that it is a replica of a German Zweihander!
For cutting into ranks of dudes holding pikes.

The average two-hander Highland claymore (there was a Lowland version too) was about a foot shorter than the average Zweihänder, and had a typical straight-armed crossguard sloping pointwards and ending in a quatrefoil…

I photographed this case of typical Zweihänders in Basel Historisches Museum a few years ago - typical very wide straight or curved guards, sometimes with side-rings, and those distinctive secondary guards (Parierhaken - “parrying hooks”) on the blade…

The men who used these were called Doppelsöldner (“double-pay men”), which they got supposedly for the dangerous duty of fighting in the front rank against opposing pikes, meaning something like this…

The costumes and helmets suggest these are re-enactors of Thirty Years’ or English Civil War, meaning about 80-odd years after Zweihänders were common, but it gives an idea of why double pay was an incentive. I think they earned it!

However, they may also have got “special skills” double pay once they proved they could handle the big two-handers correctly and not cause blue-on-blue incidents like: “Oops, sorry Franz, were those your fingers/kidneys/entrails? Hey, this thing’s longer than it looks…

Looking at Renaissance fight manuals (Marozzo, Meyer, di Grassi etc.,) the technique seems not just longsword, but also partly short polearm (something echoed in the way they were carried) which suggests using really big two-handers was a more complicated business than just “hold the safe end and hit the enemy with the sharp end.”

Neither they nor claymores were ever worn on a back-scabbard. I did a Google Image search for that obscure object of desire: modern and/or movie, every single one. No period back-scabbard is displayed in a museum, and nor does any period art show one in use, because the back-scabbard is a modern Renfair/Hollywood fantasy that didn’t exist before the late 20th century.

A commonly-seen interpretation of back-carried “claymore” is the Irish Gallowglass. Google-image that and you’ll find artwork, illustrations, figurines, war-gaming figures and even otherwise-careful re-enactors (guys, please!) with back-slung scabbards. The trouble is, they all seem based on nothing further back in history than this 1980s or 1990s painting by Angus McBride for one of the Osprey series…

…and since I don’t have the book, I don’t know where he or its author based their data for the scabbard. I’m pretty sure the rest came from this 1521 drawing by Albrecht Dürer of a real Gallowglass and his kern retainers. 

The great big sword is very much there, but any sort of back-scabbard is very much not. If anyone anywhere can find solid 500-year-old evidence that such a specialised item existed, I’ll be impressed, and more than a bit surprised. It hasn’t happened yet.

Period art…

..shows…

…Zweihänders…

…carried…

…like…

…this…

Some surprisingly long swords were carried slung from the waist (including Elizabethan rapiers so long that a law was passed to restrict their length) but to date, evidence for slinging any European sword across the wearer’s back stays in the file marked hic sunt dracones

ElfGrove Reads: Blood of Olympus Part 10

In Chapter 38. 4 hours and 4 minutes remain in the audio book.

Read More

sorasan00:

(Ch.2)

oliviasatelier:

image

Yeah, but I’ve had those moments too, so I get it.

Thank goodness for friends, amirite?

image

Quite.

Good day honey! How are you? ;d My name is Erica and I make online games! Cool uh? Me and my team are now working on a latest online game and would like to ask you a tiny favor. Could you try it how it works? It will take only few moments of you precious time dear.. try it on MY TUMBLR. Let my know how it was. Looking forward to hearing from you :) Cheers~! Erica

middlemarching:

no

I also received a very similar ask (same icon) 2 days ago, but from a user named @vhoarxalo, who I presume no longer exists because they were banned for spamming. I found the ask suspicious and deleted it without clicking through.

image

Yeah so, beware folk. This is likely a phishing or malware infection attempt.