Yeah, Yeah. Shut Up Elf.
titangroupie:

toastheaven:

horrificnotemares:

captain-mindfang:

Yes hello do you have rum ice cream 8y chance?

but all the people who own shops around cons 
every year they just see this swarm of people coming down the street in dumb costumes
"yep same shit as usual"

Dude cons make so much fucking money for these people it’s utterly ridick. After Otakon this year my dad and I went to this little pizza shop down the road form the convention center and my dad being my overly friendly, talkative dad, started chatting with the nice old lady who ran the place.
She told us about how the con brought in a TON of money into the city every year, and not only that, dramatically reduced the crime rate over the weekend. If you go too far down the road, you realize that the Baltimore convention center isn’t that far from a not really great part of town. But all those people? It makes it hard for the really bad people to do their thing. For one weekend, some of the people in the area get to go about their business feeling a little safer, and a little better off than they normally would, because the swarms of people are coming down the street in their dumb, wonderful costumes.
cons are great okay, even for those not involved with them. It’s really, really beautiful.

#not to mention bringing a sense of wonder into the mundane#I love seeing all these people in extreme costumes#sitting around munching their sub sandwiches#it’s awesome

#I wonder if the crime thing is true
I don’t have statistics, but most likely, yes. While the sheer volume of people does present more opportunity for shoplifting and theft, they also mean more eyes and more cameras. Cons (especially established local and larger ones) also have their own security as well as prompt increased police presence and patrols in the areas — as the cities know this brings in revenue and tourism and therefore want these visitors to feel safe.

titangroupie:

toastheaven:

horrificnotemares:

captain-mindfang:

Yes hello do you have rum ice cream 8y chance?

but all the people who own shops around cons 

every year they just see this swarm of people coming down the street in dumb costumes

"yep same shit as usual"

Dude cons make so much fucking money for these people it’s utterly ridick. After Otakon this year my dad and I went to this little pizza shop down the road form the convention center and my dad being my overly friendly, talkative dad, started chatting with the nice old lady who ran the place.

She told us about how the con brought in a TON of money into the city every year, and not only that, dramatically reduced the crime rate over the weekend. If you go too far down the road, you realize that the Baltimore convention center isn’t that far from a not really great part of town. But all those people? It makes it hard for the really bad people to do their thing. For one weekend, some of the people in the area get to go about their business feeling a little safer, and a little better off than they normally would, because the swarms of people are coming down the street in their dumb, wonderful costumes.

cons are great okay, even for those not involved with them. It’s really, really beautiful.

I don’t have statistics, but most likely, yes. While the sheer volume of people does present more opportunity for shoplifting and theft, they also mean more eyes and more cameras. Cons (especially established local and larger ones) also have their own security as well as prompt increased police presence and patrols in the areas — as the cities know this brings in revenue and tourism and therefore want these visitors to feel safe.

indulging-inaccuracy:

irontayguh:

an artifact from our ancestors

there’s going to be future generations of congoers who don’t know what these are because they were banned before their time
that makes me feel both very glad but also old

As someone who has been hit by one of these things by a total stranger, I am glad to see them vanish. They were banned for good reasons and I thank goodness for how quickly it happened.
On the other hand, it does seem weird to think they have/will become an obscure bit of con-going history that people won’t know of. All for the best though really.

indulging-inaccuracy:

irontayguh:

an artifact from our ancestors

there’s going to be future generations of congoers who don’t know what these are because they were banned before their time

that makes me feel both very glad but also old

As someone who has been hit by one of these things by a total stranger, I am glad to see them vanish. They were banned for good reasons and I thank goodness for how quickly it happened.

On the other hand, it does seem weird to think they have/will become an obscure bit of con-going history that people won’t know of. All for the best though really.

Spencer Chen did an A/B test on the efficacy of “booth babes” at a big trade-show, staffing a booth in one part of the floor with scantily clad models, and another with older women recruited for their people skills, dressed in professional attire.

The results were clear for Chen: the “grandmas” generated far more sales-leads and conversions than the “babes.” What’s more, the kind of attendees the “babes” attracted were less valuable to Chen’s companies: rather than roping in executives with purchase-decision power, they brought in young “IT nubs” who just wanted to get their pictures taken with models in sexy outfits.

Importantly, Chen’s point isn’t just that booth-babes turn off women at trade shows, but that they also turn off men, and he says he has the data to prove it.

The results? They were great. The booth that was staffed with the booth babes generated a third of the foot traffic (as measured by conversations or demos with our reps) and less than half the leads (as measured by a badge swipe or a completed contact form) while the other team had a consistently packed booth that ultimately generated over 550 leads, over triple from the previous year.

Everyone on the team was genuinely surprised by the results but duly convinced. It was like showing some hardened sales reps a new golf swing. I was able to replicate this a few more times throughout the year with even better results since we had a chance to further optimize our new “staffing plan.”

lunsfuhd:

ospreying:

captorvatingmituna:

ilikecomicstoo:

sigh.

This needs more notes ._.

This kind of thing makes me livid.

what the fuck? are there actually people like this out there?

All too common. This is the “convention journalism” I see 70% of the time. This is why friends see me roll my eyes so hard my head tilts when they’re like, “Oh I know a dude that’s going to/did go report on that con!’ Because all I can think is, oh fucking great another one.

fwips:

roguesquirrel:

sparklegenocide:


busket:


sassshanatalie:


this is fucking awesome. great idea.


one of them is hot sauce


One of them should be soy sauce.




dont you fucking tag this as fanime ambur

fwips:

roguesquirrel:

sparklegenocide:

busket:

sassshanatalie:

this is fucking awesome. great idea.

one of them is hot sauce

One of them should be soy sauce.

dont you fucking tag this as fanime ambur

On the subject of Photo-bombing costumed photoshoots

geekeryandhockey:

ajacquelineofalltrades:

Imagine this scenario:

You’ve gotten together with your friends a big cosplay photoshoot. You’ve planned, discussed ways to pose, along with set up a place and time where all of you are gonna get together and do this thing. You all worked really hard on your costumes and you know when you get this group together you’re gonna look AWESOME.

I liken it to an artist planning out a painting in advance, gathering their brushes, paints, carefully deciding on a color scheme, plotting out where certain things go, ect. And they finally start working on it, and they work HARD, and it’s coming together so very well and …

… Then someone runs in and throws bright blue paint on it. Maybe not much. Maybe they just get a smear up in the corner, but it’s THERE, and now it’s there for everyone to see. And it wasn’t part of the artists design, and it doesn’t add anything to the painting, and in fact, it only angers the artist and pulls focus from the overall picture.

Photo-bombers for organized photo-shoots are the blue smear in the corner.

I absolutely CRINGE when I hear people joke about planning to do this to another group. It’s tacky, and while it might be hilarious to ONE person, there are a great deal more that aren’t in on the joke, and who have worked HARD on their costumes and who are there to be together for a cohesive photo that shows off their talent along with a common grouping of characters.

If you ever consider doing this to a group, THINK ABOUT EVERY SINGLE PERSON IN THAT GROUP. You are one person, among many. This is not a protest, you are not making a point by photo-bombing, and the only message you are sending is “I have absolutely no regard or respect for anyone except myself.”

Don’t do it. Please don’t joke about it. Joking about it makes it seem like this is an okay thing to do, which again, it isn’t. It’s really rude.

If you see a big group doing their thing, ask the leader if you can grab pictures with them after they’re all done. Usually, they’ll say yes! Or, you might snag photos with a few individuals after for a better more intimate shot. Then you can do all of your crazy moves for the camera.

But respect the planning that other people do for these things. Sometimes, they’re planned almost a year in advance. And a year’s worth of planning should not be ruined by the last minute whim of some blue smear.

Relevant to my aggravation of the day, where in people argued that being upset by this (it actually happened this year to a big group shoot at Dragon Con) was “taking things too seriously” and “sucking the fun out of [cosplay]”, etc. Which is total crap.

This isn’t even about taking anything “seriously” it’s about not being a dick. Photobombing a shoot in this manner is like sticking googly eyes on someone’s piece of artwork. It’s funny for about 5 minutes and then it ruins the vision of what was intended and mars someone’s (in this case a lot of someones) hard work and effort and it’s not cool.

Again, it’s about not being a dick and spoiling something that other people worked very hard, throughout the year, to put together for the sake of your* own personal joke/fun. 

If you had spent a ton of effort to throw a party and then some random person wandered in and shoved his face in the cake “for a laugh” would you just shrug and say ‘oh well, people laughed, I shouldn’t be so serious?” No, no, you wouldn’t and by inserting yourself*, uninvited, into a photoshoot (where photos are the ENTIRE PURPOSE OF THE GATHERING) that is essentially what you’re* doing and it’s not funny nor cool.

If you come across a photoshoot and you’re dressed as Deadpool or Waldo or Carmen Sandeigo or something else that you feel would make a funny “photobomb” ASK if it’s okay to jump into a couple of shots. A lot of group will say yes and laugh and have fun with you for a couple of poses, because they’re in on the joke now and then you can move on and they can continue to creative the art they were going for. However, understand and respect that if they say no they have reasons and you should take that no gracefully and find another group that might be more willing to work with you.

As Katie pointed out, the entire thing comes down to respect and either you* get that or you* don’t.


*general you

There is a humongous difference between photo-bombing some random hall photo (haha, annoying but easily retaken) and jumping into any sort of pre-planned shoot regardless of it being a big gathering or a little one. If you’re intruding on a planned shoot, you ask permission and you ask prepared that the answer may be no and you move on. End of story. Don’t be that person.

Submit Anon: Swimwear is not cosplay

constupidity:

only the first day and already the stupid  are ruining the fun. fuck, i know that every yaoi fangirl is creaming herself over free! iwatobi swim club but walking around in a banana hammock and a beige tube top to hide your boobs is not cosplay.

cannot unsee this horror omg fuck me

Wow submitter.

I am so glad you’re here to tell people that they are having fun the wrong way, and by wrong I actually mean a way which does not suit your personal tastes but is not actually harming or inconveniencing anybody.

image

You’ve won the self-righteous fandom policing asshat award. Congratulations.

We hand out hundreds of these a day. What a special flower you are.

Also, consupidity? Tagging it with the fandom? Not cool. This isn’t people being stupid at con. This is you giving voice and validation to someone being an asshat to cosplayers because they don’t care for the costume then broadcasting it to the fandom.

Ask Before You Take [A Photo]: Simple Cosplay Etiquette

inbetweenthelineart:

I felt like I had to type this up while it’s still fresh in my mind.

It was the end of Day 4, all of us were tired, hot, and a few of us had taken off pieces of our costumes because they were becoming uncomfortable. A few people came up to us to ask for photos, we were more than happy to let them (“as long as you don’t mind that we’re not in full costume.” “Naw, that’s okay, you look awesome anyways!”). There were also the few who didn’t ask us before trying to take a picture, and to those people we politely explained that we preferred it if they asked before snapping photos. Of course, most of them apologized and then asked.

Most of them.

At one point, an older man came up behind us and aimed his camera in my general direction. I was talking to people so I didn’t really notice, but my sister did. She politely said “Sir, could you please ask before you take pictures?”

It was as if she had asked the man to give up his job and his house. He went on a tirade, saying how “this con had been so nice for the last four days, and then this" and “I’ve worked in special effects for 19 years, I was just appreciating those contacts" and “I’m not a bad guy, everyone else was so nice" and the best one “Fine, I get it. Consider the pictures deleted." (he proceeded to delete the pictures from his camera in a huff). All the while, my friends and I were trying to explain to him that no, we don’t mind having our pictures taken, we would just prefer that people asked us before doing so. But he wouldn’t have any of it. In the end, he walked away angry with no pictures, and we were standing there feeling confused and annoyed. Later while discussing this, we all realized that this encounter had slight undertones of rape culture…that this man thought he could do what he pleased simply because of how we were presenting ourselves, and became angry when we told him we did not appreciate being treated that way. TBH, I’m surprised he didn’t start calling us “bitches” during his little rant.

Cosplayers are people. We aren’t statues or art pieces that you can walk around and take pictures of whenever and however you feel like it. Just because we’re dressed up doesn’t mean you can simply shove a camera in our faces and expect us not to be annoyed or upset by it. You are NOT entitled anything. ASK. BEFORE. YOU TAKE. A PHOTO. More often than not, cosplayers will say yes, and they will appreciate that you took the time to approach them as people and not decorations.

A pretty solid article, and well worth the read.

Of interest to my followers, my volunteer-on-duty harassment incident from last year at SDCC is mentioned and linked, and I did talk briefly with the article author, Rachel Edidin, beforehand. Worth noting, NO. I never did get any form of response for reporting the incident to SDCC. The secret SDCC anti-harassment policy (of submit it in writing and then we’ll decide if you provided sufficient proof before we act) does nothing.