Aes Sidhe

arcadysabo:

elfgrove:

Hn. Interesting. I suspect this will largely not go over well. Mostly due to actual execution when the wristbands don’t mean you get in for certain, people missing wristbands because bathroom breaks, it only applying to first panel of the day, and if you’re implementing wristbands why people still have to sit in line all night. OH. And announcing this new policy so close to con. Sheesh. Could have been done better.

Stuff like this makes me wonder.  When I was younger (like 20 or so years ago…) I went to a game convention in New Jersey.  It was only $5 for a full weekend pass, but you signed up for games, and there was a fee for each game.  If you wanted in on an AD&D game run by RA Salvatore, that was $15 a seat.  If you wanted to play some pre-release Warhammer 40k armies with Games Workshop, that was $25 a seat.  So on and so forth.  I’m curious if we’re approaching a point where the con tickets themselves drop in price, but they sell tickets to Hall H panels.

(Also, why aren’t they hiring professionals to record the panels, then edit out the sneak peek copyrighted material and make a blu-ray to send out to con attendees and sell on their website.  Bought a ticket for SDCC?  A month later you get a blu-ray in the mail with all the Hall H panels.  Couldn’t make it to SDCC?  For $30 you too can have all the Hall H panels in glorious 1080p yadda yadda yadda…)

(If they are doing that dvd/bluray thing, please let me know…  I can’t afford the trip out to San Diego, but I would spend a few bucks on a disc to see all the panels…)

There’s some massively nostalgic price tiers, wow. Today you’d probably be looking at $40/$50+ depending on fame levels of the guests involved.

There’s a general dislike at cons for “nickel-and-diming” attendees as it does run counter to the fan convention concept of buying a badge to attend the event. The idea of buying tickets to specific panels becomes increasingly difficult given the schedule does not come out until a couple of weeks prior to the event. It would also encourage increased scalping from what SDCC is already subject to. (Check out San Diego’s Craigslist ads during SDCC, I’ve heard of 4-day badges being sold for a couple of hundred bucks.) While several cons do engage in “ticketing” (usually free) for major events (i.e. AMV Contests, Masquerades, concerts) or have pre-event participation sign ups (i.e. gaming contests) primarily as a way to control seating and the number of tickets match the number of seats available exactly — this is not something that can be applied to “smaller” things like panels that might be moved or might overlap schedules. These events are usually set for a known time well in advance, are timed to minimize potential overlap with regular daytime panels, and are considered special events rather than panels. Panels are intended to be the main content of a convention, the reason you buy your badge. Ticketing for every panel would be quickly become absurd, charging extra for these might cause riots. Trying to pick which are “big enough” to get called an event and be ticketed might result in some nasty posturing and bidding wars from the industry guests. Plus, every panel deemed an “event” would become the fresh hell that is SDCC badge registration repeated multiple times over, that or the Hall H line just moves to point at a ticketing booth inside the con rather than at the Hall H doors. It’s just not terribly feasible.

Plus, SDCC has been very anti-change regarding their panel system. Multiple people have suggested something as simple as clearing rooms between panels and limiting when people can start officially lining up (both fairly standard convention practices). Combining these two practices and adding some sort of marker like wristbands to avoid line jumping would do loads to prevent people spending their entire con in lines and others taking up space in a panel they don’t care about waiting for one several hours later. The biggest disadvantage would be forcing people to choose which panels they really wanted to attend. SDCC Admin think the insane lines are a proper part of the con experience and are more concerned about backlash than making the con more pleasant for the majority of attendees.

There are professionals recording many of those panels, usually they’re part of the company that is running the panel. Uploading or selling even the non-exclusive parts would involve licensing and contract changes I doubt either side is willing to do at this point. Plus, the stuff people are fighting to get in to see is the exclusive content and the time in the same room as a celebrity. Everything else (and the exclusive content too, honestly) ends up on the internet within a week or two of con, so it’s not likely DVD/Blu-Ray sales would be worth the production and contract costs.

Hn. Interesting. I suspect this will largely not go over well. Mostly due to actual execution when the wristbands don’t mean you get in for certain, people missing wristbands because bathroom breaks, it only applying to first panel of the day, and if you’re implementing wristbands why people still have to sit in line all night. OH. And announcing this new policy so close to con. Sheesh. Could have been done better.

Okay, let’s kick this speculation in the can before rumor mongering and inflated expectations blow this all out of proportion and people get genuinely upset.

Teasing the idea? Maybe. Does this mean YJ is getting a 3rd season? No.

To be more specific, I think I can say with 99.9% certainty that YJ animated is not getting a new season. For one, Greg Weisman and Brandon Vietti have moved on to new projects.  Weisman in particular is joining a hugely successful franchise in Star Wars Rebels and is not likely to return to something that’s already been canned once. Weisman verified today on twitter that there are no renewal plans. [link]

Perhaps the most logical point to be made though is the announcement line itself. The announcement is coming from WAC — Warner Archive Collection. WAC does not produce new content, it releases existing content in collected editions.

Like Beware the Batman and Green Lantern: The Animated Series, I feel confident in suggesting the “Young” announcement from Warner Archive Collection will be Young Justice getting a collected Blu-Ray release.

I’ve Got The Fandom In Me

theorlandojones:

Going to San Diego Comic-Con?  

I’m honored to be on a panel that’s all about FANDOM, along with fyeahcopyright, a representative from wattpad, #Henry-Jenkins, and flourish! So let’s celebrate —

image

Here’s the details: 

Creativity is Magic: Fandom, Transmedia and Transformative Works
July 25, 7:30-8:30 PM
Room 26AB

This panel looks at the fascinating world of fan/creator interactions. In the last 18 months, fans have been paid for fanfic, licensed their fanart to networks and shows for use on t-shirts, DVDs and crowdfunded projects, created and played apps for and with actors and films, published books that started out as fanfic and advanced creativity and discussions every day. Compared to 2004 - or even 2010 - connections between fandom and transmedia storytelling have changed so vastly - but on ArchiveOfOurOwn, Wattpad, tumblr and Vine, and at fancons, the “gift culture” and traditions of transformative works endure. Explore the landscape with Orlando Jones (Sleepy Hollow), Flourish Klink (Chief Participation Officer at The Alchemists), Professor Henry Jenkins (Provost Professor of Communication, Journalism, and Cinematic Arts, USC) and Aron Levitz (Wattpad) in a discussion moderated by Heidi Tandy (FYeahCopyright.com). 

cleolinda:

Yeah… fuck all this.

Have you ever wanted recognition for loving the things you love? Well, it’s time for you to win some awards.

I’ve never wanted recognition for loving something, no. For hard work, maybe. Simply for love? No. Yeah, I know that a lot of pop culture sites pit shows against each other to get fandoms to vote as often as they can, basically proving whose fandom is the votiest, under the guise of “best show.” Sometimes the results are helpful, sometimes ridiculous; everybody’s got to pay the bills, so it goes. But no one’s ever pitted the fans themselves against each other before. Not like this.

Fans and talent from the nominated shows and movies will be present at Petco Park during Comic-Con, with an awards special to air on July 27 on MTV and mtvU. Awards voting starts today on mtvU’s website, excepting competition in the “Best Fandom Forever” category, which will be held entirely on Tumblr and will pit massive, long-lasting followings against each other.

Let’s not just choose some great things to recognize non-competitively; let’s pit followings against each other. You realize they want you to fight each other like gladiators so they can make money off fandom, right? Make you fight over whose charity campaign (“Fandom Feat”) was more valuable? You think that they gain nothing from clickbait polls that will get 100,000s of hits? That they’re running that ~awards special~ commercial-free? ”Best Fandom Forever”? Get the fuck out of here.

Since SDCC and harassment are in the news again, did anything ever come out of your harassment complaints from last year?

samhumphries:

iamdavidbrothers:

Man I got an email that told me they take harassment very seriously and that I shoulda followed an unspoken rule so as to avoid their goons running up on me three deep like I stole something in the booth where I was working.

But I only got that email because I sent another one six months after I sent the original report like “can a brothers at least get a ‘we hear you, but sorry hoss, we can’t do anything about it also who cares’ instead of all this silence?”

Maybe those email addresses were just dead for the latter half of 2013?? weird, you’d think SDCC could spring for some working email servers or a gmail forwarding service or something

This is the same harassment policy and enforcement that San Diego Comic Con says “seems to be working.” Also, “I think we’re comfortable in the policy we have.”

#SDCCHarassment — My Suggestions for Policy Enactment

Okay, I feel like I should do a serious response to this since I’ve been sharing a couple of my stories and pretty vocally supportive of get-a-real-harassment-policy-SDCC since a couple of years ago when the Girl-Wonder.org founded Con Anti-Harassment Project pushed for it. Plus, I’ve had a couple of people ask me for input on what I think the best course of action given my con experience and my (admittedly incomplete but a bit above average) knowledge of SDCC in particular.

This will be a long post.

Read More

Hand out life vests? Are you daft? That would give the passengers the impression this ship has a sinking problem. That wouldn’t be good for the brand at all. It’s but a trickle. Carry on and continue bailing per our current unsinkable policy. And rearrange the deck chairs while you’re at it.
Captain Smith, 15 April 1912 (probably)
bobberton:

comicsalliance:

SAN DIEGO COMIC-CON DOESN’T WANT TO ADDRESS ITS HARASSMENT PROBLEM BECAUSE PEOPLE MIGHT THINK IT HAS A HARASSMENT PROBLEM
By Chris Sims
San Diego’s Comic-Con International has a problem that it doesn’t want to address. See, a few weeks back, a group called GeeksForCONsent launched a petition urging Comic-Con to adopt a formal harassment policy in place of the broad, basically unenforceable “code of conduct” that’s currently in place. Like many conventions, SDCC has a huge problem with women — particularly women cosplayers — being harassed by other con-goers and dubious media “professionals”, and the present policy offers victims little recourse.
Comic-Con’s existing policy, which can be found in its 200-page programming guide and on the event’s website, is as follows:

Attendees must respect common sense rules for public behavior, personal interaction, common courtesy, and respect for private property. Harassing or offensive behavior will not be tolerated. Comic-Con reserves the right to revoke, without refund, the membership and badge of any attendee not in compliance with this policy. Persons finding themselves in a situation where they feel their safety is at risk or who become aware of an attendee not in compliance with this policy should immediately locate a member of security, or a staff member, so that the matter can be handled in an expeditious manner.

GeeksForCONsent’s petition asks that Comic-Con amend the policy thusly:
A harassment reporting mechanism and visible, easy to find on-site support for people who report harassment.
Signs throughout the convention publicizing the harassment policy and zero-tolerance enforcement mechanisms.
Information for attendees on how to report harassment.
A one-hour training for volunteers on how to respond to harassment reports.
As a response to the petition, David Glanzer, Comic-Con’s director of marketing and public relations — someone whose actual job is to talk to the media about this sort of thing — gave a remarkable interview to CBR‘s Albert Ching where he suggested, astonishingly, that instituting a more explicit anti-harassment policy would be a problem in and of itself, because people in the media and the attendee base might think that Comic-Con has a problem with harassment.

…because we’re really an international show, and have 3,000 members of the media, I think the story would be harassment is such an issue at Comic-Con that they needed to post these signs around there. Now, people within the industry, and fans, know that isn’t the case, but the general public out there, and I think the news media, might look at this as, “Why would you, if this wasn’t such a bad issue, why do you feel the need to single out this one issue and put signs up about it?” I think that’s a concern.

That’s not really how rules work.
READ MORE

I can’t talk about what the higher ups for comic con say but I work as a floor manager and implying that we don’t care or recognize harassment on the floor really fucking bothers me. Myself and the other 30+ floor managers are always on the lookout for harassment and we really want the attendees to feel safe. I can’t really speak on the things I know nothing about but if your takeaway from this article is that Comic Con doesn’t care about harassment you are dead fucking wrong.

I see you are 19 (according to your profile) and therefore possibly have not been a floor manager all that long, therefore you might not be very experienced in the more political sides of con staff shenanigans.
I’ve attended SDCC since 2006. I’ve worked as staff and volunteer at SDCC off and on, and I know many staffers via the sometimes insular social network that is SoCali convention staff circles. While I can confirm that some staffers will talk about good intentions regarding preventing and handling harassment — if and when it is brought up, which is not often and therefore part of the problem, the rug-sweeping that occurs — for most of them, their actions in actual instances of harassment are frequently not so good. They talk a good game and then fail on the actual field. They care, but they suffer from the same issues any untrained person does when harassment (especially in it’s less blatant than a highly visible ass or boob grab forms) actually occurs. They get very concerned with understanding and sympathizing with the harassers and put heavy burdens of proof on the victims when it’s a matter on one person’s word against another’s they’re more likely to side with the harasser. If the person accused is a fellow staffer or a friend of, they’re increasingly likely to defend the harasser with “X didn’t mean it that way”, “that’s just how X is”, and variations on “you’re over-reacting”. I’ve seen that in action.
So long as SDCC is not instituting actual and consistent training as mandatory for people with the title of “staff” and “security” (I am aware security is contracted out to 3 or more different security companies and they need to all be on the same page on this stuff, they often are not) and publicizing what to do when harassment occurs clearly and plainly on the website, in the pamphlets, in the halls, and to volunteers when they are waiting in the general containment area while awaiting assignments. SDCC is too big an event to permit such vagueness in policy and execution.
No one said no one at the con cares. They said the higher ups don’t seem to care enough, and that a con this big needs a clearly laid out policy and reporting system. Preferably, a con this size and with this much history should have training too.
That you’re more concerned with saying Not All Staffers than using your position within staff to help encourage change — that doesn’t put a lot of faith in staff’s actual investment in anti-harassment for the people behind this movement.

bobberton:

comicsalliance:

SAN DIEGO COMIC-CON DOESN’T WANT TO ADDRESS ITS HARASSMENT PROBLEM BECAUSE PEOPLE MIGHT THINK IT HAS A HARASSMENT PROBLEM

By Chris Sims

San Diego’s Comic-Con International has a problem that it doesn’t want to address. See, a few weeks back, a group called GeeksForCONsent launched a petition urging Comic-Con to adopt a formal harassment policy in place of the broad, basically unenforceable “code of conduct” that’s currently in place. Like many conventions, SDCC has a huge problem with women — particularly women cosplayers — being harassed by other con-goers and dubious media “professionals”, and the present policy offers victims little recourse.

Comic-Con’s existing policy, which can be found in its 200-page programming guide and on the event’s website, is as follows:

Attendees must respect common sense rules for public behavior, personal interaction, common courtesy, and respect for private property. Harassing or offensive behavior will not be tolerated. Comic-Con reserves the right to revoke, without refund, the membership and badge of any attendee not in compliance with this policy. Persons finding themselves in a situation where they feel their safety is at risk or who become aware of an attendee not in compliance with this policy should immediately locate a member of security, or a staff member, so that the matter can be handled in an expeditious manner.

GeeksForCONsent’s petition asks that Comic-Con amend the policy thusly:

  • A harassment reporting mechanism and visible, easy to find on-site support for people who report harassment.
  • Signs throughout the convention publicizing the harassment policy and zero-tolerance enforcement mechanisms.
  • Information for attendees on how to report harassment.
  • A one-hour training for volunteers on how to respond to harassment reports.

As a response to the petition, David Glanzer, Comic-Con’s director of marketing and public relations — someone whose actual job is to talk to the media about this sort of thing — gave a remarkable interview to CBR‘s Albert Ching where he suggested, astonishingly, that instituting a more explicit anti-harassment policy would be a problem in and of itself, because people in the media and the attendee base might think that Comic-Con has a problem with harassment.

…because we’re really an international show, and have 3,000 members of the media, I think the story would be harassment is such an issue at Comic-Con that they needed to post these signs around there. Now, people within the industry, and fans, know that isn’t the case, but the general public out there, and I think the news media, might look at this as, “Why would you, if this wasn’t such a bad issue, why do you feel the need to single out this one issue and put signs up about it?” I think that’s a concern.

That’s not really how rules work.

READ MORE

I can’t talk about what the higher ups for comic con say but I work as a floor manager and implying that we don’t care or recognize harassment on the floor really fucking bothers me. Myself and the other 30+ floor managers are always on the lookout for harassment and we really want the attendees to feel safe. I can’t really speak on the things I know nothing about but if your takeaway from this article is that Comic Con doesn’t care about harassment you are dead fucking wrong.

I see you are 19 (according to your profile) and therefore possibly have not been a floor manager all that long, therefore you might not be very experienced in the more political sides of con staff shenanigans.

I’ve attended SDCC since 2006. I’ve worked as staff and volunteer at SDCC off and on, and I know many staffers via the sometimes insular social network that is SoCali convention staff circles. While I can confirm that some staffers will talk about good intentions regarding preventing and handling harassment — if and when it is brought up, which is not often and therefore part of the problem, the rug-sweeping that occurs — for most of them, their actions in actual instances of harassment are frequently not so good. They talk a good game and then fail on the actual field. They care, but they suffer from the same issues any untrained person does when harassment (especially in it’s less blatant than a highly visible ass or boob grab forms) actually occurs. They get very concerned with understanding and sympathizing with the harassers and put heavy burdens of proof on the victims when it’s a matter on one person’s word against another’s they’re more likely to side with the harasser. If the person accused is a fellow staffer or a friend of, they’re increasingly likely to defend the harasser with “X didn’t mean it that way”, “that’s just how X is”, and variations on “you’re over-reacting”. I’ve seen that in action.

So long as SDCC is not instituting actual and consistent training as mandatory for people with the title of “staff” and “security” (I am aware security is contracted out to 3 or more different security companies and they need to all be on the same page on this stuff, they often are not) and publicizing what to do when harassment occurs clearly and plainly on the website, in the pamphlets, in the halls, and to volunteers when they are waiting in the general containment area while awaiting assignments. SDCC is too big an event to permit such vagueness in policy and execution.

No one said no one at the con cares. They said the higher ups don’t seem to care enough, and that a con this big needs a clearly laid out policy and reporting system. Preferably, a con this size and with this much history should have training too.

That you’re more concerned with saying Not All Staffers than using your position within staff to help encourage change — that doesn’t put a lot of faith in staff’s actual investment in anti-harassment for the people behind this movement.

princelesscomic:

So, here’s the thing #SDCC or San Diego Comic Con or Comic Con International as it tries to make people call it with minimal success is refusing to amend their harassment policy and provide any real and visible support to cosplayer/women/humans who don’t enjoy having people treat them like meat, because then people may think they have a harassment problem.

I understand their concern.  Outside of the comics community people don’t really know that Comic Con can be a dangerous and sometimes deadly place for people.  This is especially true if you’re a woman or cosplayer in a crowded place with tons of people and no help easily visible or available.  To them, protecting their brand is more important than protecting their attendees, supporters, and creators.

So, it seems to me there is only one way to solve this:  Everybody needs to start sharing their SDCC harassment stories in as public a forum as possible.  Contact comics news sites, normal news sites, feminist news sites.  Hashtag blogs, tweets, and facebook posts with #SDCCHarassment.  Dig up and share some of those old classics I’ve seen passed around that just don’t seem to have gotten deep enough into the media to really affect these fine folks.

They had a choice to make of whether to protect people or the brand.  Let’s make the choice easier.